EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning 13(3): e3

Research Article

A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED

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  • @ARTICLE{10.4108/el.1.3.e3,
        author={Razieh Nilforooshan and Nicoletta Adamo-Villani and Hazar Dib},
        title={A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED},
        journal={EAI Endorsed Transactions on e-Learning},
        volume={13},
        number={3},
        publisher={ICST},
        journal_a={EL},
        year={2013},
        month={10},
        keywords={computer animation, engineering education, LEED, e-learning, building sustainability.},
        doi={10.4108/el.1.3.e3}
    }
    
  • Razieh Nilforooshan
    Nicoletta Adamo-Villani
    Hazar Dib
    Year: 2013
    A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED
    EL
    ICST
    DOI: 10.4108/el.1.3.e3
Razieh Nilforooshan1, Nicoletta Adamo-Villani1, Hazar Dib2
  • 1: Purdue University, Department of Computer Graphics Technology, West Lafayette, IN, 47907
  • 2: Purdue University, Department of Building Construction Management, West Lafayette, IN, 47907

Abstract

This paper presents ongoing research aimed at investigating the efficacy of computer animations in improving college students’ learning of building sustainability concepts and practices. The use of animations in educational contexts is not new, however scientific evidence that supports their effectiveness as educational materials is still limited. This paper reports an experiment that explored the impact of an educational digital animation, called “LEED-ERS”, on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. Specifically, the animation focused on the LEED category of Sustainable Site. Results of a study with 68 students show that viewing the animation led to an increase in subjects’ declarative knowledge by 15%. Compared to traditional learning methods (e.g. reading assignments with static images), viewing the animation led to significantly higher declarative knowledge gains.